i live/work in NY but my employer filled out my tax docs as nj and all taxes paid to nj-what do i do?



I live and work in NY but my employer goofed and filled out my tax documents for NJ such that all my taxes were paid to NJ. My employer said it’s too late to get a corrected w-2 and suggested i file in NJ instead? Can I do this how? do i have to pay NY state?

i live/work in NY but my employer filled out my tax docs as nj and all taxes paid to nj-what do i do?
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2 Replies to “i live/work in NY but my employer filled out my tax docs as nj and all taxes paid to nj-what do i do?”

  1. Why didn’t you raise this issue with the first paycheck?? Letting it go for upwards of a year or more is probably going to cost you.

    File a NJ non-resident return showing $ 0 income and the NJ tax withheld. Attach an explanatory note to the return for clarification.

    Then file your NY resident return and pay the taxes due. Use the NJ refund to pay off NY. Unfortunately NY is probably going to hit you with penalties and interest for late payment. There’s little or no chance of getting out of those, however, as you’re well past the filing deadline and SHOULD have had this corrected with your first paycheck. Attach an explanatory note here as well and hope for the best, but be prepared to fess up with the penalties and interest as well.

    Edit: Don’t bother with calling the IRS as another poster suggests. This is strictly a STATE tax issue. The IRS has no dog in that fight and cannot help you. You and your employer share equal fault in this — your employer for messing up in the first place and YOU for not catching it with the first paycheck. Whenever you get paid, READ THE PAYSLIP and make SURE that it is accurate! If you catch an error on payday, it’s child’s play to correct it right away. Letting it slide for a year and never checking your payslips was a major error on your part.


  2. Your employer is an idiot. He ought to pay whatever it costs to get your taxes done professionally and get this mess straightened out, including any penalties you might wind up paying because of his error.

    I’d try calling the IRS and ask them what to do about it.





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